About AGR

 

Yes, we like new volunteers. If you are over 18 and are not living with another adult, you must join AGR as a Single member ($25); if you are younger than 18, your family must join as a Household member ($40).  These fees cover liability insurance for you or your family and our quarterly newsletter.

on 07/01/2015 by Dana Haywood

 

We will contact you only if you have been approved to adopt and if our Placement Team decides that you are the best fit for a particular dog.

on 07/01/2015 by Dana Haywood

Generally no unless certain circumstances occur that would make the dog available outside Arizona.  If the dog is available outside the State of Arizona, the dog's profile would be noted that they are available outside Arizona.

 

Generally no unless certain circumstances occur that would make the dog available outside Arizona.  If the dog is available outside the State of Arizona, the dog's profile would be noted that they are available outside Arizona.

on 07/01/2015 by Dana Haywood

 

The current status of every dog rescued by AGR is shown on the website. If a dog is listed as Medical Hold, it means there are some medical issues that have to be treated before we would place the dog with a potential adoptive family. If a dog is listed as Adoption Pending, this means the dog has been placed with a potential adoptive family and we are waiting for the dog to “settle in” before we finalize the adoption. This period of time is usually 3 weeks. Finalized adoptions are shown under Success Stories. Due to confidentiality issues, AGR cannot divulge any other information about the dog. We do not allow a surrendering owner to meet with the dog’s new owner. Such a meeting would be traumatic for all concerned, especially the dog, who would not understand why he/she is no longer with his/her original family.

on 07/01/2015 by Dana Haywood

Yes, Arizona Golden Rescue is a 501 (c) 3 organization. Our tax ID # is 26-4433734. All donations made to our group are tax deductible.

 

on 07/01/2015 by Dana Haywood

 

AGR Polo Shirts can be ordered online in our emall section.  Scarfs are done by Deb Orwig.  You can email her at .

on 07/01/2015 by Dana Haywood

 

In an attempt to weed out dogs with known aggressive tendencies, a member of our Intake Team does a preliminary evaluation before a Golden is accepted into the program. While not foolproof, the evaluation helps protect all concerned. Once accepted, the Golden is placed into one of our foster or foster-with-intent-to-adopt (FWITA) homes. The foster or FWITA family further evaluates the dog’s personality in a home environment and provides some basic obedience training. The Golden also receives a veterinary examination. The Golden is then ready for adoption. If the foster family chooses not to adopt, another potential adoptive family is matched with the dog from our list of approved applicants

on 07/01/2015 by Dana Haywood

 No, unfortunately, not all Goldens that are brought into Rescue are healthy. When first accepted by AGR, each dog is given a medical examination by a licensed veterinarian. If the dog’s vaccines are due or if the vaccine history is unknown, vaccines are given. If the Golden is not spayed or neutered already, this procedure is done. If the dog is ill with a treatable condition, medicine is provided by AGR. Blood testing, except for valley fever and heartworm, is not usually done unless the doctor feels such is warranted. A significant percentage of Goldens that are rescued in Arizona have valley fever. Since the medication for this treatable condition is expensive, AGR will provide it for three months following the finalization of an adoption of a dog that has tested positive for the disease. Potential adoptive families are always told about any medical problem that is known about a rescued dog.

on 07/01/2015 by Dana Haywood

 

Most rescued Goldens are housebroken. However, sometimes a dog has been kept in the backyard for an extended period. In such cases, some housetraining will probably be necessary. It is rare that puppies will be housebroken before they are 6 months old. Even a dog that has been housetrained may have “accidents” when placed in the unfamiliar environment of a new home.

on 07/01/2015 by Dana Haywood

 Most of the Goldens that will need rescuing come from private owners; some will be rescued from county shelters or from the Humane Society. Some come to AGR through veterinary referrals, others from Good Samaritans who have found wandering dogs. The majority of the dogs we will accept into the rescue program and adopt out will be purebred Golden Retrievers, although we will also accept mostly-Golden mixes. The adoption fee is the same for a purebred or a mix, as we do the same veterinary work-up regardless of purebred status.

on 07/01/2015 by Dana Haywood

 The most common reasons for the surrender are because of home foreclosures and the family cannot take the dog to the new home or “I don’t have time for the dog.” Families also give up their dogs because of allergies, death, and, sometimes, because they did not understand the activity level and time commitment that a Golden Retriever requires. Some are given up because of divorce or relocation to a home where a dog cannot be kept. Occasionally, when a new human member is added to a family, the parents find they do not have time to properly care for the dog. A dog may be given up because it has a medical condition that will be expensive to treat. We have also heard families say they think the dog is “too big”, “too rambunctious”, “too expensive to feed and maintain”, “too hard to train”, “it sheds too much”, “it digs up my backyard when I leave it tied outside”, “it gets nervous during thunderstorms”, or just that “it’s too old.”

on 07/01/2015 by Dana Haywood

 Some of our members belong to the Golden Retriever Club of America. We cooperate with Maricopa Animal Care and Control Services, Pima Animal Control, the Arizona Animal Welfare League, the Arizona Humane Society, and other shelters around the state. Some of our members also belong to the Companion Animal Association of Arizona, Therapy Dogs International, Inc. or are Delta Society Pet Partners.

 

on 07/01/2015 by Dana Haywood

 An Events Calendar is available on our website. Members of AGR will be doing gift wrapping at local bookstores during the holidays. This is a fun and profitable activity with many opportunities for public education. We will be participating in local events; all will be listed on our Website calendar. We will have educational booths at many public venues, which may include local pet supply stores and dog shows. Check our Website calendar for scheduled events. We host major fundraiser each year which is a golf tournament . We also will be participating in PACC 911 Adopt-a-Thons and in their annual Bowl-a-Rama for Animal Rescue. In March, we will have an annual members’ (and dogs, of course!) picnic and funday. We will have dedicated fundraisers to raise money to pay for the extraordinary medical costs of some rescued dogs.

on 07/01/2015 by Dana Haywood

Golden Retrievers are sporting dogs and most are quite energetic. Males weigh 75-90 pounds and females 55-70 pounds, depending on height. Goldens also have long fur and shed throughout the year. Once or twice a year, they shed substantially. Daily brushing is recommended. If someone in your family has allergies, or if your lifestyle requires uncompromising housekeeping, one of the non-shedding breeds may be more suitable. Golden Retrievers are extremely intelligent, which is why they are used as guide dogs and assistance dogs. While this is a positive factor in your companion, it also means that you should plan to take your Golden through a basic obedience class and train the dog to be a well-mannered member of your family. Some of the dogs that come into our program have already had basic obedience training. However, it is good to repeat this program so that you can learn to communicate and bond with your dog. Golden Retrievers are known for their loving, affectionate temperament and MUST live in your home. They do not make good kennel dogs, and if this is in your plans, you would do well to seek a breed that is less devoted to family life.

Within sixty days after adoption, we recommend that you take your Golden to a veterinarian of your choice for introduction and to deliver any veterinary records that we will send you after the adoption is finalized. We suggest that you take a fecal sample in for analysis, since we do not have this done routinely at our initial vet checks. As far as other expenses, you can expect to spend about $350 per year for food. We recommend a well-balanced premium food. Regular veterinary care will cost about $200 per year. We suggest that heartworm preventative be given to our rescued dogs; this will cost approximately $90 per year. Bowls, bed and toys will probably cost at least $75. Grooming by a professional groomer at a minimum of every eight weeks will cost about $300 per year, bringing the total annual cost to around $1000. This figure does not include veterinary care when the dog gets sick, boarding or pet-sitter fees when you go on vacation, or other expenses. Be sure you can afford this dog before you decide to adopt!

 

on 07/01/2015 by Dana Haywood

 

Yearly membership dues are $25 for a Single or $40 for a Household. Membership benefits include subscription to our quarterly newsletter, notification of upcoming local events and information of interest to dog owners, the opportunity to attend AGR-sponsored activities, member discounts on some of our merchandise, the opportunity to participate in the annual election of officers, access to meeting Minutes and financial status reports, and a good feeling when you help support AGR’s efforts to find loving homes for needy Goldens and Golden-mix dogs. Application forms can be obtained by calling or e-mailing us or downloading one from our website. Anyone who desires to foster or adopt a dog from AGR must become a member.

Members are encouraged to help with any of the various committees: Intake, Shelter Walking, Transport, Home Evaluations, Placement, Follow-up, Health Care, Membership and Fundraising. We also occasionally need help from families willing to foster a dog. If you are interested in volunteering, please contact us.

on 07/01/2015 by Dana Haywood
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