Adoption/FWITA

 

Before you can be considered to become a FWITA (Foster With Intent To Adopt), you must start the process by filling out an Online Foster/FWITA Adoption Application. The online application is located under Membership and Adoption on the drop down menu above. After your completed application is received, you will be contacted within 24-48 hours to schedule a home visit. Once the home visit has been completed and you have been approved to adopt, you entered into our database to try and match you with an incoming dog. If for some reason you do not hear from us within 48 hours please feel free to contact us on our WAGSline @ 623-566-WAGS(9247). Our WAGSline is answered live from 8:00am till 8:00pm 7 days a week for your immediate assistance. If you get a voice mail greeting it is because we are on the line with another caller and will call you back ASAP.

on Wednesday July 01 by dana

 

  • You will be given preference to adopt the dog you foster.
  • You will get a dog more quickly.
on Wednesday July 01 by dana

 

As a FWITA, you will be brought a dog that may not have been “home tested.”

  • If the dog is a stray or rescued from one of the county shelters, AGR will have no history on the dog.
  • The dog may not be housebroken.
  • The dog may be untrained to the leash or to car rides, and may have no “house manners” or any kind of obedience training.
  • The dog may not be used to being around children or cats.
  • The dog may be ill, and, if so, may have a disease that can be transmitted to another dog that may already be in your household. If a resident dog gets sick because it has contracted an illness from a foster Golden, AGR will not cover any medical expenses incurred by the resident dog.

If you have a resident dog(s), we encourage you to protect him as much as possible by:

  • having your resident dog(s) vaccinated against Bordatella (kennel cough)
  • keeping your resident(s) separated from a newly rescued dog until the dog’s health can be evaluated by a vet.
on Wednesday July 01 by dana

 

Foster/FWITA families are responsible for daily care of the foster dog, including:

 

  • feeding
  • exercising
  • socializing
  • brushing and grooming, as needed
  • reinforcing basic obedience commands
  • observing and evaluating general behavior and temperament
  • and, of course, providing love and security to a special Golden at an often difficult time in his or her life

As a FWITA, it will also be your responsibility to take the dog to one of our approved participating veterinarians for its initial health evaluation. You may also have to make additional trips to the vet if the dog needs to be spayed or neutered or is ill and requires follow-up visits. AGR will cover all approved veterinary costs as long as the dog

on Wednesday July 01 by dana

As long as you are fostering, you will be responsible for providing a good quality dog food, purchasing any toys or chewies you choose to provide and, perhaps, covering any necessary long-distance telephone calls. Necessary approved veterinary expenses, including any medication required to treat any medical problem, are paid for by AGR as long as the rescued Golden is in foster care. The cost for transporting the dog to and from the vet is not reimbursed but is tax deductible if you keep track of your mileage.

 

on Wednesday July 01 by dana

 

Our adoption fees are based upon the Golden’s age. Puppies up to 2 years of age are $400; dogs 2 - 5 years of age are $375; dogs between 5 and 9 are $350; dogs over 9 years of age are $300. If a pair is adopted, the cost will be the full fee for the younger dog and half-fee for the other/older dog.

on Wednesday July 01 by dana

When AGR takes a Golden into Rescue, we incur veterinary costs. Sometimes these costs are minimal, as when only a general physical is done. In other cases, we have significant medical expenses. What little money we might receive on the adoption of one dog will go to offset the medical expenses of the next dog. Adoption fees by themselves never cover all our expenses with rescued dogs. The average cost of veterinary services is generally over $1000 per dog.

 

on Wednesday July 01 by dana

 

The first step in adopting a rescued Golden from AGR is to submit an Online Adoption Application which is available from the Membership and Adoption dropdown menu above. The application must be completed in full. We ask many questions in order to match a dog to your lifestyle and family routine. Your application will be reviewed by our Home Evaluation Coordinator, who will then assign a Home Evaluator to conduct a telephone interview and arrange to visit you in your home. Our list of available dogs changes weekly, ensuring that you will soon meet your new Golden companion.

on Wednesday July 01 by dana


This is a personal choice, but the life span of dogs is increasing, so don’t discount the older Goldens. A Golden can live to 15 years with proper care, although 10-12 years is the average. A Golden at 7 to 9 years of age is still full of energy and is quite appropriate for the household that does not want to cope with the activity and training of a younger Golden. Senior Goldens can still take long walks, swim, retrieve, and enjoy the favorite part of their day, simply lying near their human companions. We rarely get dogs under one year of age into the program. However, we consider a dog up to two years old to be a “puppy” because of the energy level and enthusiasm of this breed.

 This is a personal choice, but the life span of dogs is increasing, so don’t discount the older Goldens. A Golden can live to 15 years with proper care, although 10-12 years is the average. A Golden at 7 to 9 years of age is still full of energy and is quite appropriate for the household that does not want to cope with the activity and training of a younger Golden. Senior Goldens can still take long walks, swim, retrieve, and enjoy the favorite part of their day, simply lying near their human companions. We rarely get dogs under one year of age into the program. However, we consider a dog up to two years old to be a “puppy” because of the energy level and enthusiasm of this breed.

on Wednesday July 01 by dana

 Puppies less than 6 months of age are occasionally surrendered to rescue, the youngest we have ever rescued was 2 days old!   Pregnant females that later produce puppies sometimes also come into the program. Puppies are made available for adoption after they are 8 weeks old. If you want a puppy and are willing to wait for AGR to get one, please file an adoption application now, so that we can put your family on our approved-to-adopt waiting list. Then, you will be among the first considered when puppies become available

on Wednesday July 01 by dana

 The majority of foster families end up adopting the dog they foster, regardless of its age! Golden Retrievers are such loving, wonderful dogs that one of any age will steal your heart and become a member of your family within a very short time. In fact, families who have adopted senior Goldens rave about what incredible and mellow dogs they are and how quickly they fit right in to the family routine.

on Wednesday July 01 by dana

 A resounding YES! We consider a Golden a senior at 9 years of age. Most still have plenty of energy and fun and are so VERY loving. Although they may not be with you as long as you wish, you can have many wonderful years together. The sense of joy in giving a senior Golden a home is unequaled. Goldens quickly bond to their new families. If you have reservations, we will be happy to put you in touch with people who have adopted dogs from a wide variety of age groups from puppies to 15 years of age. The seniors are usually full of mischief, love to take walks and especially enjoy being held and loved. And remember… no housebreaking or teething (in itself a reward).

on Wednesday July 01 by dana

 No. The very need for AGR is the best reason not to breed. AGR believes that there are already too many homeless and unwanted dogs, so we ensure that all of our rescues are spayed or neutered. There is a canine over-population problem because people breed their Goldens “for the kids,” or to “get money out of the dog,” or because “he/she is so beautiful we want one of his/ her puppies.” Breeding is a time-consuming, costly venture that is best left to professionals who truly want to better the breed and understand the intricacies of the breeding selection process. Few people make money from responsible breeding. Breeding should be done only after careful evaluation of the dog's temperament, physique and genetic history. In addition, it is better for the long-term health of the dog for it to be sterilized. Testicular and ovarian cancers are common causes of death in older, “intact” dogs.

on Wednesday July 01 by dana

 All of our Goldens are fostered in members’ homes. We do not have a kennel or other boarding facility. All Goldens currently available for adoption can be viewed on our website. Sometimes arrangements can be made through our Placement Manager to meet with the family that is fostering a particular dog. We also occasionally have Meet-and-Greet events with available dogs at local pet supplies stores. These events are listed on our website calendar.

on Wednesday July 01 by dana

 

Because we are all volunteers, many of whom work full-time jobs, we regret we cannot return phone calls to advise you how soon you may expect a Golden. If your application is approved, the waiting period can be anywhere from 24 hours to several months. Our methods are time-proven and successful. We work to match a Golden that will remain in your home for the balance of its life and be a good canine companion. The more you restrict the factors involved in choosing a dog – age, sex, coat color, etc. – the longer the wait may be before we find the perfect dog for you.

on Wednesday July 01 by dana

 

The Foster/FWITA/Adoption Application allows you to specify the kind of dog you are willing to foster/adopt – age, sex, special needs or not, etc. It will also tell us about your family members, other pets, family habits, place of residence and give us some idea why you want to adopt a rescued Golden. Based on the information in the application and on feedback from a Home Evaluator, our Placement volunteers very carefully match what is known about approved-to-adopt families with what is known about the rescued dog, so that we can place the dog in the very best permanent, adoptive home. Every possible effort is made to place a dog with you that fits your preferences, but we cannot guarantee a complete match.

on Wednesday July 01 by dana

 

Most families who will adopt a dog from AGR will foster the dog for us first. A foster family thus becomes a volunteer for AGR. In order to comply with insurance requirements, all AGR volunteers must be paid members.

on Wednesday July 01 by dana

 

Once your application is approved, AGR’s Placement Team will be on the lookout for an incoming dog that matches your criteria. If it is a dog already in foster care and ready for adoption, an appointment will be made for your entire family to meet the dog. Please be on time for this appointment and plan to spend 1-2 hours at the foster home. The foster family has final approval of the potential adoption. You MUST wait 24 hours after this initial meeting to decide whether or not you want to adopt the dog. If your decision is “YES” and the foster family approves the match, then a member of the transport team will transport the dog to your home. Once the dog has been introduced into its new environment, you will need to read and sign the Terms & Conditions of Adoption and give a copy of this, along with the adoption fee, to the AGR representative who delivers the dog. In three weeks, if all goes well and the dog has been cleared medically, a letter of adoption finalization will be sent to you. Yes, you can, by agreeing to be a Foster-With-Intent-To-Adopt. In fact, being a FWITA is the most common way through which to adopt a dog from AGR.

on Wednesday July 01 by dana

 

After you are approved to be a FWITA, you will get a dog matched to your family as soon as it comes into the rescue program. A rescued Golden will be brought directly to your home by an AGR Transport Team member. The dog may come from a veterinary facility where it has already been examined, or may be an owner turn-in. Although as a FWITA, you may specify that you will not accept a dog that has been a stray or taken from a shelter, we hope you will be flexible, because all such dogs will already have had a medical workup. You must pay the requisite adoption fee for the dog and sign the Foster/FWITA Agreement and the Terms and Conditions of Adoption contract at the time the dog is delivered to your home. By signing, you agree to hold AGR harmless for any damage caused by the foster dog to your home or family. In addition, you must pay the membership fee if you are not already a member. You may pay with a check, money order, or by providing credit card information. Cash will not be accepted.

The dog will be fostered by your family for a minimum of three weeks, during which time you will be responsible for taking the dog to one of AGR’s approved veterinarians for all necessary medical treatment. After this “trial run” of three weeks, you will be contacted by the Placement Team and asked if you intend to adopt the dog. If yes and the dog has been medically cleared, a letter of adoption finalization will be sent to you. If no, then you will work closely with the Placement team to find the best match for the dog with another family. If you do not adopt the dog you have been fostering, you will have the option of getting a refund on the adoption fee or applying what you have already paid toward the fee for another dog.

on Wednesday July 01 by dana

No, many of our foster family members are currently employed full or part time and still provide a quality environment for the dog. However, our first concern is safety: for you, for your family, for your own dog(s) and for the rescued dog. Therefore, any time you are unable to directly supervise the foster dog, you should confine him or her to a small, secure area, preferably a crate (AGR may be able to lend you one if you don’t have one.)

 

on Wednesday July 01 by dana
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